Strategic Plan

Strategic Plan

2017-2020

Revised 2018

Approved by EOC Board of Directors April 5, 2017

Approved by the EOC Board of Directors July 25, 2018

Vision

Washington County EOC will be known throughout the community as a highly effective non-profit agency that provides comprehensive, holistic, top-quality programs and outreach services to the public.

Mission

We support Individuals and Families in attaining Self-Sufficiency

By providing Services, Sharing Resources and through Community Collaboration.

We Value:

The Resiliency of the Human Spirit

Each Individual’s Right to Self-determination

The Integrity and Professional Behavior of Our Staff

Our Customers’ Engagement and Active Participation in the Services Received

Our Responsibility and Accountability for the Operation of Quality Programs

Background:  Washington County Economic Opportunity Council, Inc. (EOC) celebrated its 50th Anniversary in 2016.  Incorporated in 1966, EOC is a 501(c)3 corporation, operating within the Community Action Network; with a solid package of Community Action programming (Head Start(HS)/Community Service Block Grant(CSBG)).  In addition to Federal Funding, EOC works in partnership with numerous local organizations and entities to deliver services such as WIOA, Heating Repair (LIHEAP), Senior Transportation and Food Pantry Services.  Programs have been delivered consistently and proudly and are targeted at locally identified needs based on a Community Needs Assessment. As a Community Action Agency, EOC is subject to the Performance Goals established by Federal Health and Human Services (HHS) – Office of Community Services.  These standards set parameters for evaluation of one agency against another across the country. All Community Action Agencies are required to use a Performance Planning and Measurement System called ROMA (Results Oriented Management and Accountability)

EOC is poised to plan how it will address the causes and conditions of poverty into the next 50 years.  EOC published a Community Assessment in October of 2015. This Assessment has been used by Senior Management to guide agency program changes and facilitate community discussion on how to address issues of poverty in Washington County.  EOC enters into this strategic planning process with a solid understanding of Community Need and the beginning of community partnerships and relationships to move forward with current and future programming opportunities. With those opportunities come challenges that include an uncertain political and funding environment, lack of unrestricted funding to invest in program growth and changes in Labor laws that will impact our recruitment and retentions of quality staff.

In January of 2018 the EOC Board of Directors and Senior Management began a formal strategic planning process.  The Goal of the process it to review and update the Strategic Plan. Senior Management prepared SWOT Analysis of the overall agency.  Program Directors prepared a deeper dive into individuals programs and grants to demonstrate the opportunities and challenges that we are currently facing.  During a day-long Retreat the Board and Senior Management engaged in a robust discussion of the issues and maintained the following areas for the Strategic Objectives moving forward through 2020.

  1. Branding and Agency Identity
  2. Staff Recruitment, Retention and Development
  3. Programming Infrastructure and Opportunities for Change
  4. Fund Development

The Board determined that within each of these Objectives we need to focus on Sustainability.  The Board defined this as looking for ways to ensure that our programs are relevant to community need, demonstrate balanced risk/benefit and are financially viable in both the long and short term.

The Board then charged the Senior Management of the Organization to go back and expand on these objectives to develop a Strategic Plan that conforms to the Performance Standards of Community Action, Head Start and other grant funded programs, and will allow us to work within the conscripts of ROMA.  The Board further charged Senior Management to adhere to the following priorities as they address these objectives.

  1. Maximize the funding that we have available while maintaining the highest level of services to our county.  Decrease reliance on only grant funding, develop a planned process of Fund Development with long term goals of stable sources of non-federal, unrestricted funds
  2. Clearly define the community/service region and boarders that our programs serve.  Use new Branding and Marketing Campaign to increase enrollment to underserved areas that have not been or are underserved by other providers. (Vermont Board)
  3. Maintain a focus of sustainability for current and future service package.  Sustainability is defined as looking for ways to ensure that our programs are relevant to community need, demonstrate balanced risk and are financially viable in both the long and short term
  4. Address staff issues/concerns regarding recruitment/retention.  Understanding the difference between overall retention and retention within individual program areas.  Supporting ongoing training for staff to improve professional skills and program operations.
  5. External Branding – Public perception and relationship building.  Development and implementation of Rebranding and Marketing in partnership with Trampoline and Mannix Marketing that was authorized in 2017.
  6. Expand/Refine/Retain funding opportunities  Folded into #1 above

What follows is a full exploration of the opportunities and challenges of successfully implementing the Strategic Objectives within the parameters of the priorities approved by the Board.  It is the intention to use this plan as a basis for an agency wide work plans that can be reported on regularly and amended as necessary.

Strategic Priority #1 – Branding and Agency Identity

EOC is becoming recognized in the Washington County area and the surrounding region as a vibrant and committed nonprofit dedicated to addressing issues of poverty throughout the region.  The Community Assessment, published in 2015, provided an opportunity to lead a community discussion of poverty that has successfully translated into relationships and partnerships to address poverty.  EOC, through its Senior Management is becoming recognized for “thought leadership” and commitment to positive change. While we have made significant progress within the area as nonprofit leader there is still perceptions of our programs as limited in scope and impact.  For EOC to take part of in conversations around early childhood education, health care transformation and services access we need to look critically at our resources and what barriers remain to meeting our Vision of recognition as a dynamic nonprofit leader in the community.  In the Winter of 2017 the Board engaged the services of Branding and Marketing consultants with the expressed purpose to change the public presence and perception to allow us to effectively communicate with our community to both customers and partners. Issues of enrollment, service penetration will demand a communication plan and materials that is relevant to our current and potential customers.  Language relevant materials, use of social media and an updated and user friendly website are necessary to engage and maintain our customers. Of equal importance is our need to “tell our story” to funders and community partner in a way that engages them in working together to address poverty issues in the county. Our inability to tell the story limits our ability to engage with the business community and potential financial supporters.

Our original adoption of this objective identified both internal and external branding as a priority – with this plan we now shift primarily to external branding and how we can impact public perception and the growth of potential partnerships to move our agency forward.

External – EOC is the second largest not-for-profit entity in Washington County (Fort Hudson Health Systems is the first).    EOC was formed by the County fathers in order to draw in the funding available in the Economic Opportunity Act in 1964, there has always been close organizational and programmatic ties between the County and EOC.  

The use of the County Name in front of EOC implies county connection.  Our location in the County Municipal Center further supports a perception of EOC as part of the county government.  How do we balance the obvious financial and programmatic supports that the county provides to us of in-kind and space that satisfies our matching requirements with the need to recognized EOC as an independent entity worthy of community support?  It is imperative that as we move forward with rebranding our message that we assure our County partners that while our name may change our mission to support Washington County needs remains in place.

Our connections within the community are mostly related to service and programming.  Branching out and establishing ties to the business community through participation in the regional chamber of commerce, service organizations and with School districts all have begun to  raise awareness of EOC as a stand-alone entity worthy of support and partnership. We still have issues “telling our story” in a narrative that captures the imagination and willingness to be part of broad based community change.  

The hallmark of a high-performing Not-for-Profit is a strong and dedicated Board of Directors; in addition to staff, they are the greatest public voice for EOC.  EOC is governed by a Tri-partite Board as established under Community Action Legislation. Balancing membership between Elected Officials, Community Members and Representatives of Low-Income/Customers creates unique challenges and opportunities moving forward.   Recruiting new Board Members for vacancies is challenged by having to first identify individuals who fit the open category and who are also willing to serve. Improved branding and messaging will improve board recruitment. As the Agency emerges as a known community entity we would hope that membership on the Board becomes a valued privilege.

The Board has taken significant steps toward engagement in the governance of EOC.  New Board leadership has contributed to greater transparency and involvement by the Board in discussions and active decision making.  Building on these changes is vital to the Agency’s continued growth. Changes to the By-laws that govern the structure and expectations for the Board will support future development of the Board.  A survey of the Board at the end of 2017 highlights improved communication, more transparency and better problem solving as being important achievements on the Board. At the same time the Board struggles with the volume of information that is provided and the manner it is provided.  The Board has requested that Board Reports focus more on Data analysis and trends over time. The Board is also determined to engage in a more planned Committee Process to allow for more detailed program discussion outside of Board Meetings – allowing Board meetings to be more about Policy and Advocacy.

The Board needs to develop a development plan to improved member training, recruitment and succession planning to ensure that the officers of the Board continue to take the agency forward in a planned way.  

Strategic Priority #2 – Staff Recruitment, Retention and Development

EOC employs approximately 130 full and part-time staff, with a $4.1M annual payroll.  Without our staff we could not operate high quality programs. External mandates for increased minimum wage, and other changes to Labor laws, are going to have significant impact on available resources, scope of services and staffing structure.  Changes to the wage and hour regulations governing exempt status impacted our status in late 2016 – the uncertain political and funding environment leaves many unknowns as to what further impacts we will have to adjust to in the coming years. NYS has enacted a minimum wage increase that will phase in over the next 3 years.  At this time there is no corresponding increase in the Federal minimum wage – since most of our funding is federal in origin we cannot reasonably assume increased grant funding to bridge this increase. If all things remain equal it will cost EOC $250,000 per year for every dollar per hour increase in minimum wage. The proposed increase from $9.70 (in 2016) to the $12.50 will mean an increase in excess of $600,000 in payroll costs over the next 3 years.  We presume that these funds will have to come from the development of unrestricted funds.

EOC; as with most not-for-profits in general, and Community Action Agencies specifically, does not pay salaries and/or benefits that are consistently competitive with the government/private sector.  While we are at or above comparable salaries within our networks (Community Action and Head Start specifically), we are unable to compete with salaries within our community. We continue to monitor regional pay rates when opening are available and to date remain in the low to mid-range for regional starting salaries.  Unemployment is currently at 4.9%, which puts us in a workers market. Competition for individuals with the necessary skills in areas such as education and Health professions have left vacancies in staffing for greater than 90 days, which impacts our program operations. We continue to find resources to support services provided by high demand professions such as Nurses and Mental Health to be able to maintain our ability to operate our programs when we cannot hire necessary skill sets to meet program requirements.

Over the last several years have EOC has successfully standardized payroll, HR practices, benefits and staff development to improve our staff’s perception of “One Agency”.  Communication and transparency of actions at all levels must be consistent across all programs and at all levels of operations from Senior Management to the last person hired.   There must be clear pathways to communicate changes to policy, practice and programs that allow all staff to hear those changes, participate in decision making as appropriate, and voice concerns in a way that demonstrates value and respect between and among all staff.  

With access to open and transparent communication comes the responsibility for using the established pathways of communication and chain of command to allow for the establishment of expectations about behaviors and performance for all staff that are clear across the entire agency.  It is the establishment of expectations and performance standards that will allow us to create a culture of “One Agency” that is not less than each of its parts, but greater than the sum of them all.

We will have to right size program structure and service levels to ensure that we maximize available funding, supporting staffing necessary for program standards at salary and benefit levels that ensures competitive recruitment and retention of quality staff.

Strategic Priority #3 – Programming Infrastructure and Opportunities for Change

Programming Infrastructure – Increased emphasis on performance management and attainment of measureable outcomes as a condition of grant funding is the new reality for grant funded programs.  The ability to record, maintain and analyze program operations to support those needs will require a necessary investment and use of new and better technology. Handling technology needs is necessary not only to operate those programs we are currently providing but necessary to be able to initiate any new programming in the future.  EOC’s pathway to technology use is as varied as its programs and the diversity of its program locations.

As currently configured there is no single technology source, provider or support network that works across all programs – nor is there a unified way to make technology decisions that takes into consideration impacts of one choice on all.  By virtue of the location of some programs and administration within the Washington County Municipal Center the County plays a large role in the provision and support of technology to EOC – Internet, Phone, email and Websites are all supported within the County Systems – which comes back to the agency as in-kind support.  Head Start; because it exists outside the county systems, and is geographically spread across the county; purchases those same support systems from a private company. The separation of the 2 systems limits communication and perpetuates the separation between the program and the agency.

The development of a consistent application of technology will require planned analysis of technology needs across all programs – Recommendation will be to issue a proposal for technology analysis and recommendation for future consideration  – Analysis to include, computers, phones, email, internet access and website/social media development. Part of the Branding/Marketing Campaign is the development of a single website for all programs, the integration of a staff and Board portal to assist with communication and access to common materials.  Looking forward we anticipate that we will have to begin to identify how we will move to a single technology platform that includes document sharing, email and web access.

Coordinated technology will also allow us to maintain the records necessary to manage and report outcomes.  Outcomes measurement and Quality assurance is a unique skill set – we will have to either develop the capacity to across all of our programs to meet funding and regulatory mandates.

Opportunities for Growth – As noted we are heavily reliant on Federal and State Grant funding – with little opportunity for the growth of unrestricted funding to invest in other programs and services.  Consolidation of financial systems has allowed us to monitor spending and use existing grant resources more effectively to maximize our ability to retain and convert unrestricted funds.  We need to identify, within individual programs opportunities for expansion of services that complements our existing programming and allows us to diversify revenue without significantly increasing expenses.

Some of our best opportunities for growth may lay in diversifying our existing programs to meet identified community needs.  We need to identify opportunities to offer the services and support in a way that allows for increased private investment – either by consumers or corporate donations.  Our community needs assessment should identify opportunities for value added programming that can allow us to further enhance our unrestricted resources. We have reapplied for our Medicaid provider number for transportation services.  

Recent State initiatives around Universal Pre-K and Regional Economic Development Grant opportunities allow us the best opportunity to bring in additional funds through collaboration and partnership with other programs and service providers.  As a 501(c)3, we can act as a funding pass-through for community projects without having to bear the cost of additional program operations, such as space and staff. By balancing our mission with our resources, our goal should always be to ensure that the programs and services necessary to support the development of self-sufficiency within our community are available, not that we are responsible to deliver all those services ourselves.

Strategic Priority #4 – Fund Development

EOC is currently funded with at least 80% grants, primarily from federal sources.  In the current political and economic environment that degree of dependence on public funding is dangerous to long term sustainability of programs, support for staff and overall community impact.  The overall need to develop additional resources is necessary to meet matching requirements for new and future grants, allow innovation of programs and services and allow us to remain responsive to the changing needs of our customers, our staff and our community.  In addition to the uncertain environment of our funding sources, there are other economic and business realities that we are going to have to address to remain operational in the future – These things include an increase in NYS minimum wage with no corresponding increase in the federal levels and a need to increase wages for professional positions to meet local wage comparability (comparability with salaries and wages outside of the Community Action and Head Start Network – primarily at this point the Public School Systems). The long standing thought of we will just “Do more with less is no longer realistic”, reductions in funding, loss of grant revenue without making efforts to increase available funds will simply mean we “Do less”.   

Fund Development should not be limited to increasing cash in the bank alone, but must include cultivation of donations of in-kind services, materials and resources that support program operations.  Leveraging these non-cash resources for things we are currently paying for will free up current grant funds in programs such as CSBG that can be used to support innovation and development of other programs and services.  Our first priority will be identifying activities, contracts, relationships and interactions as potential sources of match for existing grant funds – Sufficient in-kind resources to match existing grants will allow us to use actual cash donations in a much more discretionary way (as allowed under NFP Law and OMB guidance).  It is clear however that we will not be able to rely solely on in-kind as match for federal grants – due to some of the other economic factors discussed above.

EOC needs a short and long term plan to grow cash donations from individuals, business and organizations to allow us to meet our mission.  That plan should be targeted, mindful of the economics and resources of the area we are soliciting from. We estimate that we need to develop a long term fund development plan for $500,000 to $600,000 annually (cash and in-kind).  The scope, resources and skills necessary for this kind of development need to carefully and fully investigated and stepped out over an extended period to ensure a positive outcome.

2017/2020 Community Needs

In September of 2015, the Board of Directors approved a comprehensive Community Assessment of needs and resources within Washington County.  The Assessment included demographics and the findings of other regional assessments, reports and coalitions to identify relevant causes and conditions of Poverty in Washington County.

The following issues were identified as contributing to Poverty within the County

  1. Income – Median Household income in Washington County is below state and national averages.  Median income for Female Head of household is approximately $10K less than Male Head of Household
  2. Housing – There is a distinct lack of income subsidized housing.  Existing units have significant wait lists as well as having waitlists for housing vouchers to reduce the cost of FMR units.  This pushes many low-income individuals out of community centers into substandard housing units with a greater incidence of housing exploitation and social isolation.
  3. Transportation – 7% of the residents of the county do not have access to transportation.  There is limited access to public transportation and for hire transportation is expensive, coming primarily from the Glens Falls Area in neighboring Warren County.  Numerous programs offer medical transportation, but there is still unmet need. There is little or no availability of transportation to get to employment or educational opportunities.
  4. Health and Nutrition – Washington Co. ranks 38th out of 62 counties for overall health.  In looking at the data supplied by County Health Rankings, the social determinants of Health (education, transportation, housing, food security) have the largest impact on health – Improvements in these areas also off the greatest opportunity to improve overall county health.
    1. Nutrition ranks high as one of the prime impacts on overall health – access to affordable, quality food is very difficult within Washington County – there are currently 4 major grocery stores in the county, numerous $$ stores (with expanded food sections) and convenience stores – smaller communities rely on convenience store for staples, with higher costs and limited selections.  A broad array of food pantries seeks to support individuals with limited access to food – but they are limited themselves to hours of operation and capacity to meet local needs.
  5. Employment – as noted unemployment is currently at 4.9% in Washington County.  There is some sense that this is in reality close to maximum employment for the county.  When you look at where people are employed it is primarily in lower wage, service sector employment.  While this means that we have significant numbers of households with income we have a very high percentage of working poor.  This anomaly is reflected in the high level of poverty of individuals 18 -21 years of age – Jobs that would have been available to this group previously are now being taken by their parents and grandparents – There are limited opportunities to access entry level positions to gain employment skills for later in life.
  6. Social Services and Supports – The county municipal government is the primary provider and payer of services that supports low-income individual – All services are generally located centrally at the County Municipal Center in Fort Edward – making access challenging to people in the outlying areas of the county.

In the assessment feedback from consumer of services as well as our partners within the community prioritized employment, housing and health care as the most important issues.  While providers indicated that these priorities were important to the consumers that they served, they also felt that these were issues across the county. Consumers were naturally focused on their individual needs and did not perceive this to be a problem for the larger population as a whole.  It is this isolation and overwhelming sense of being “along in their need” that challenges our ability to impact the causes and conditions of poverty.

In the months following the release of the Community Assessment, EOC held community forums and focus groups to examine the information within the assessment and provide recommendations for steps to move forward.  What was very apparent to the community groups was that alleviating any one cause or condition of poverty by itself would not be effective in reducing overall poverty in Washington County.

Acknowledging the need to comprehensively address the causes and conditions identified in the assessment the group added these strategies and a mechanism to address the issues across the county

  1. Promotion of a consistent and cohesive view of poverty – Recommending the adoption of Ruby Payne’s body of work, Bridges out of Poverty as a foundation for understanding the nature of poverty with guiding principles to apply to how we address the identified causes and conditions of poverty.
  2. Create locally accessible opportunities to access current and future services that are locally driven and trusted – This is a recognition of the size and diversity of the county – each community possesses unique values, priorities and needs, one size fits all service delivery does not meet those needs effectively.

Since these Strategies were put forth – EOC has been a leader in implementing Bridges out of Poverty within Washington County, successfully working with community partners to train and promote Bridges principles to service providers, schools, churches, and communities.  EOC is actively promoting the recognition of Washington County as a Bridges Community. EOC was invited by Washington County to take a leadership role in promoting strategies necessary to address poverty within the county as the Lead for the counties participation in the National Association of Counties Rural County Challenge.  In late 2016 the county, with EOC in a leadership role, was selected to participate in a yearlong strategic planning process with the University of Wisconsin’s County Health Rankings Organization to develop an implementation plan for Community Outreach Centers throughout the county that are locally accessible, trusted and based on locally identified needs.

EOC will engage in the development of a new Community Assessment during 2018.  Anticipated completion will be in the Fall of 2018. Using the lessons learned during the use of the 2015 Assessment we will actively seek the input of consumers within the new Assessment.  EOC will engage a cross sector Advisory Group to review both quantitative and qualitative data obtained during the Assessment Process and help for the recommendations to improve resources and services across the county.

Community Needs and the Strategic Work Plan

The Strategic Plan guides our agency activity for the next 3-5 years.  The identification of challenges and opportunities allows us to develop measurable projects and activities that support our Mission and achieve our Vision of becoming a Robust, Performance Driven Not-For-Profit.   Achievement of Goals and outcomes will become the expectation of all Grants, public and private going forward.

Outcomes from 2017 are identified in Blue

New or existing items in progress for 2018 are identified in Red

ROMA (Results Oriented Outcome Management and Accountability) is a Management System developed as part of the Government Performance and Results Act, 1993 to measure program effectiveness by focusing on results, service quality, and customer satisfaction.  ROMA is the Management Standard that all Community Action Agencies are required to use to measure performance.  Community Action measures its impact across 3 domains – Individuals/Family, Community and Agency.

ROMA has established 6 National Goals that allows Performance to be measured across all Community Action Agencies:

  1. Low-Income People become more Self-Sufficient (Individual/Family)
  2. The conditions in which low-income people live is improved (Community)
  3. Low-Income people own a stake in their community. (Community)
  4. Partnerships among supporters and providers of services to low-income people are achieved. (Agency)
  5. Agencies increase their capacity to achieve results. (Agency)
  6. Low-Income people, especially vulnerable populations, achieve their potential by strengthening family and other supportive systems (Individual/Family)

Each Goal has a range of National Performance Indicators that provide a measureable outcome that is in turn collected nationally to demonstrate the impact of Community Action – By monitoring our individual outcomes we can in turn understand the impact that our activities, services, and customer interactions have across the 3 Domains of Community Action.  EOC will use the new ROMA Performance indicators to measure agency activities – ROMA has categorized activities within the 6 National Goals to include Strategies, Services and Performance Indicators.

ROMA demands that all programs and services support a Community Need identified through a Community Assessment.  The Strategic Work Plan identifies strategies that meet those needs and support the Priorities established by the Board of Directors as outlined in this Plan.  Over the life of the Strategic Plan; activities, services and projects will be undertaken to address the needs in support of our Strategic Priorities. The success of those activities will be measured by the documented achievement of outcomes defined by the performance indicators.  

These activities are listed under the National Goals that they will be measured by.  Activities can impact in one goal or several depending on the nature of the activity.  Each strategy is linked to the strategic priority it supports and are broken down into Short Term (within the next year), Medium (one to two years), Long Term (greater than 2 years).  Further work at the program and staff level will break these activities down into the specific work plans necessary to meet measurable performance outcomes.

Senior Management will be responsible to report to the Board of Directors and interested Advisory and Policy Councils as to the progress on this plan.  It is imperative that those bodies are able assess the success or failure of specific activities and make recommendations to adjust strategic priorities in a planned way.

Summary Strategic Work Plan – 2017/2020 – Update 2018

Short and Long Term Goals

Individual/FamilyCommunityAgency Capacity
Goal 1 – Low Income People Become more self-sufficient – Outcomes from supportive activities necessary for the movement towards self-sufficiency and the reduction and elimination of barriers preventing self-sufficiency.  Self-Sufficiency is more than employment and employment related activities.Goal 2 – The Conditions in Which Low-income People Live are Improved – Outcomes that describe the allocation and focusing of public and private resources for antipoverty purposes, improvement in the community infrastructure, and creation of employment and other resources to support low-income people in their transitions toward self-sufficiency.Goal 4 – Partnerships among supporters and Providers for Services to Low-Income People are Achieved – Outcomes measure the impact of partnerships and collaboration on clients and the communities.
Strategic Objectives– Improved Program Infrastructure and Opportunities for change, Improved Staff Retention and Development

Strategic Priorities – Sustainability of programs and Services, Maximize existing and future funding, Fund Development to meet identified needs.

Community Needs – Employment, Accessible Services, Improved Income, Education Opportunities, Health and Nutrition

Current Agency Resources – Career and Family, Head Start, Bridges out of Poverty

Strategic Objectives – Agency Branding, Fund Development

Strategic Priorities – Maximize current and Future Funding, Sustainability of current and future services package, External Branding

Community Needs – Access to Services. Transportation, housing, employment

Current Agency Resources – Career and Family Services, Head Start, Bridges out of Poverty, Board of Directors

Strategic Objectives – Agency Branding/Marketing, Fund Development

Strategic Priorities –  Definition of Community Boards and Service Regions, Fund Development

Community Needs – Access to Services, Nutrition Services, Education, Housing Resources

Current Agency Resources – Head Start, Career and Family, Bridges Out of Poverty, Rural County Challenge, Board of Directors, Administration

Board of DirectorsBoard of Directors

Update for 2018 – Board will approve a Branding/Marketing Campaign that will support the implementation of public private partnerships to support community engagement to improve the conditions in which low income people live.

Board of Directors

EOC BOD will use their individual and collective resources to develop community partnerships and relationships to promote the interests of low-income individuals in the community

  • Participation in advocacy efforts with elected officials to ensure continues program operations – in progress 2018
  • Development of advocacy agenda that accurately represents the consensus of the BOD that can be used by Agency Administration and Sr. Management in Public Outreach – in progress 2018

EOC BOD will support the recognition of donations from individual and community organizations to encourage public giving

  • Thank-you notes for all donations – in Progress 2018
  • Identification of Sources of Public and Private Donations within their individual spheres as appropriate and able.  Waiting for the implementation of Marketing Plan
Administration/AgencyAdministration/Agency

EOC will promote the development of Community Outreach Centers by local communities and organizations based on locally identified priorities – in progress 2018

EOC will support the voice of low-income people through the promotion of Bridges Out of Poverty- in progress 2018

Administration/Agency

EOC will maintain leadership role in Countywide discussion of poverty through participation in Rural County Challenge project/Development of Community Outreach Centers. – Continues 2018

EOC will develop a Fund Development Plan which will increase partnerships with local businesses and organizations to increase in-kind and local sources of income. Waiting for Branding, Marketing Campaign adoption – 2018

  • Non-Fed Share sources/HS/EHS developed $350,000 of new or additional in kind for HS Grant – 2018
  • FFS opportunities for Housing and Energy Services – in progress 2018
  • Grant Funds to support Expansion of Existing and Future funding outside of Federal Sources

EOC will develop community recognition of EOC as vital nonprofit resource in the community that cultivates public and private donations to improve access to services for low-income people.  Will incorporate Branding and Marketing Message into Fund Development Activities – 2018

Family Development

  1. We will provide full-day programming for all enrolled center-based children to extend learning hours that will lead to improved school readiness.  Impact: All Head Start children will have skills necessary to enter kindergarten with a solid foundation for school readiness. Families will have affordable, safe daycare for their children allowing them to return to or obtain full time employment. Discontinued-

New Long Term Goal 2018: EOC will become the community leader in early learning and family resource development to assist parents in moving out of poverty.

Short Term Objectives:

  • Extend all programming to full day- Discontinued
  • Reorganize Staffing Structure-Completed 7/1/2017
  • New Objective: Increase enrollment through full marketing plan- in progress 2018
  • Submission of Conversion/Reduction application to bring enrollment in line with community need.
  1. Head start will foster a mutually beneficial relationship with families and community stakeholders to improve parent and community engagement and achieve a healthy, safe, family-oriented community.

Impact: Families will be fully engaged in their child’s early learning experience and will achieve success in the PFCE Seven Family Outcomes and be able to support their child’s growth and development as they progress through the education system, and therefore becoming more self-sufficient.

Washington County EOC, Inc. HS/EHS will identify district partners and community organizations throughout the county as evidenced by signed MOUs and/contracts with all 11 school districts and 6 community partners. Progress continues for 2018.

Family Development

  1. Head start will foster a mutually beneficial relationship with families and community stakeholders to improve parent and community engagement and achieve a healthy, safe, family-oriented community.

Impact: Families will be fully engaged in their child’s early learning experience and will achieve success in the PFCE Seven Family Outcomes and be able to support their child’s growth and development as they progress through the education system, and therefore becoming more self-sufficient.

Washington County EOC, Inc. HS/EHS will identify district partners and community organizations throughout the county as evidenced by signed MOUs and/contracts with all 11 school districts and 6 community partners. Progress continues for 2018.

  1. Provide exemplary support and opportunities for ongoing skill development to enhance staff feelings of competence and professionalism, and be recognized regionally as a desired place to work.

Impact: Staff will enjoy a positive environment in which to promote high performance which will lead to the organization’s mission to be integrated with employee practice yielding the best possible outcome of services to children and families. Short Term Objectives of identifying a professional development model, training staff to the model, and initiating and maintaining monthly professional development meetings have been completed.

New Organizational structure provides more support to direct line staff through supervisors who are located in the same building as teachers, and mentor opportunities through the evidenced based model of practice based coaching.

For 2018: Focus on individualizing training to ensure higher skill development as part of succession planning for the FD program.

Family Development

  1. Head start will foster a mutually beneficial relationship with families and community stakeholders to improve parent and community engagement and achieve a healthy, safe, family-oriented community.

Impact: Families will be fully engaged in their child’s early learning experience and will achieve success in the PFCE Seven Family Outcomes and be able to support their child’s growth and development as they progress through the education system, and therefore becoming more self-sufficient.

Washington County EOC, Inc. HS/EHS will identify district partners and community organizations throughout the county as evidenced by signed MOUs and/contracts with all 11 school districts and 6 community partners. Progress continues for 2018.

Through a marketing plan, Head Start will receive tools to better explain what we do, making it easy for outside organizations to refer to EOC.- New and in progress for 2018.

Career and Family Services

Short Term

  • Cross training staff to fill future gaps in staffing.
  • Launch 2 sessions of Getting Ahead

Long Term

  • All staff use integrated case management with customers.
  • Getting Ahead fully staffed by volunteer graduates

In Progress – These will be ongoing in 2018. 3 staff are currently enrolled in Family Development Certification training to prepare them for a Case Management approach. Launching Getting Ahead has been slow but staff still working on it. 2 Staff achieved FDC credential in June of 2018 (final staff was promoted and we withdrew her from class)

Career and Family Services

Short Term

  • Create Fee for Service program repairing low income people’s homes as a contractor for HOME and HUD Rural Development grantees.

Long Term

  • Grow FFS to include contracting with additional agencies and grants.  
  • Expand Transportation program

Complete – Handyman hired and have begun working both internally (Head Start buildings) and externally.

Have reapplied for Medicaid number to do Medicaid transports for Managed Care companies.

Career and Family Services

Short Term:

  • Community Garden and FFS program have positive effect on community perception of who EOC is and what we do.

Long Term:

Most point of contact services provided out of storefront in community

Complete and in progress for 2018

Individual/FamilyCommunityAgency
Goal 6 – Low-Income People, Especially Vulnerable Populations, Achieve their Potential by strengthening Family and Other Supportive Systems  – Outcomes are achieved by persons or families who maintain a level of stability or well-being as a result of Community ActionGoal 3 – Low Income People Own a Stake in Their CommunityOutcomes describe the participation of low-income people in community organization and community activities including volunteer and paid involvement,  It includes business and home ownership, indicators of positive community change.Goal 5 – Agencies Increase their Capacity to Achieve Results – Agencies that are well run and meet accepted standards of excellence demonstrate continuous improvement and capacity to meet the needs of low-income individuals and families and communities.  These Outcomes are measured by the agencies adherence to National Performance Standards and governing rules and regulations.
Strategic Objectives –  Opportunities for Change, Program Infrastructure, Staff Recruitment and Development, Fund Development

Strategic Priorities – Maximize funding, Sustainability, Staff Issues, Define Service area and Boarders, Refine/Retain Funding

Community Needs – Transportation, Housing Access, Access to Services, Nutrition Supports

Current Agency Resources – Head Start, Career and Family, Bridges Out of Poverty

Strategic Objectives – Program Infrastructure/Opportunities for Change,

Strategic Priorities – Maximize Funding, Sustainability, External Branding,

Community Needs – Access to Services, Education, Employment

Current Agency Resources – Career and Family, Head Start, Bridges Out of Poverty, Rural County Challenge, Board of Directors

Strategic Objectives – Program Infrastructure

Strategic Priorities Focus on Sustainability, Fund Development

Community/Agency Needs – Improved Technology, Competitive Salaries, And Improved Structures.

Current Agency Resources Board of Directors, Administration

Board of DirectorsBoard of Directors

BOD will support ways to bring the voice of low-income individuals into the Board process through inclusion in committees and outreach activities – in progress 2018

Board of Directors

BOD will support and assist with the implementation of a Fund Development Plan to increase availability of non-grant based resources and discretionary funding necessary to support current and future agency programs. Will be integrated into Branding/Marketing Plan in 2018

EOC BOD will develop a succession plan to ensure Board leadership has the skills and understanding to support Administration and Sr. Management in ongoing Agency Operations.  Targeted in 2018

EOC BOD will work with Administration to cultivate a list of potential Board Members across all Board Sectors, promoting Board Service to EOC as a valued Targeted in 2018

Administration/AgencyAdministration/Agency

EOC will use relationships with Community Groups and Organizations that represent the interests and experience of low-income and vulnerable populations to ensure that we are meeting community needs with current and future programming.  Marketing and Branding in 2018 to assist with development and strengthening of community relationships

Administration/Agency

EOC will actively seek appropriate measures to increase and safe guard agency financial and physical resources for current and future use.

  • Fund development of non-grant, discretionary resources across all programs. Ongoing 2018
  • Review of Pension Management and Controls to ensure maximum returns. Ongoing 2018
  • EOC Management will develop and maintain a planned response to potential changes to, or termination of, funding. Ongoing 2018

EOC will develop a Technology Plan that incorporates all programs, protects client information and allows for tracking of client specific services and outcomes. Converted Career and Family to CAP Systems end of 2017.

Family Development

  1. Head start will foster a mutually beneficial relationship with families and community stakeholders to improve parent and community engagement and achieve a healthy, safe, family-oriented community.

Impact: Families will be fully engaged in their child’s early learning experience and will achieve success in the PFCE Seven Family Outcomes and be able to support their child’s growth and development as they progress through the education system, and therefore becoming more self-sufficient.

Short Term Objectives: Washington County EOC, Inc. HS/EHS will strengthen parents understanding of their role as their child’s first educator as measured by their participation in program parent engagement activities.  We will increase attendance in each of the following by 20% each year starting with 20% for year 2:

  • Parent workshops/ groups
  • Policy Council
  • Parent/Teacher Conferences
  • Home Visits
  • Case Management

Although parent engagement has not improved in all areas- there has been a significant increase in engagement in Policy Council and parent and child activities.  The objective will continue, and program will focus on creating educationally satisfying parent committees that meet the needs of the parents.

  1. Provide exemplary support and opportunities for ongoing skill development to enhance staff feelings of competence and professionalism, and be recognized regionally as a desired place to work.

Impact: Staff will enjoy a positive environment in which to promote high performance which will lead to the organization’s mission to be integrated with employee practice yielding the best possible outcome of services to children and families.

Short Term Objectives of identifying a professional development model, training staff to the model, and initiating and maintaining monthly professional development meetings have been completed.

New Organizational structure provides more support to direct line staff through supervisors who are located in the same building as teachers, and mentor opportunities through the evidenced based model of practice based coaching.

For 2018: Focus on individualizing training to ensure higher skill development as part of succession planning for the FD program.

Family Development

  1. Head start will foster a mutually beneficial relationship with families and community stakeholders to improve parent and community engagement and achieve a healthy, safe, family-oriented community.

Impact: Families will be fully engaged in their child’s early learning experience and will achieve success in the PFCE Seven Family Outcomes and be able to support their child’s growth and development as they progress through the education system, and therefore becoming more self-sufficient.

Short Term Objectives: Washington County EOC, Inc. HS/EHS will strengthen parents understanding of their role as their child’s first educator as measured by their participation in program parent engagement activities.  We will increase attendance in each of the following by 20% each year starting with 20% for year 2:

  • Parent workshops/ groups
  • Policy Council
  • Parent/Teacher Conferences
  • Home Visits
  • Case Management

Although parent engagement has not improved in all areas- there has been a significant increase in engagement in Policy Council and parent and child activities.  The objective will continue, and program will focus on creating educationally satisfying parent committees that meet the needs of the parents.

Family Development

  1. Provide exemplary support and opportunities for ongoing skill development to enhance staff feelings of competence and professionalism, and be recognized regionally as a desired place to work.

Impact: Staff will enjoy a positive environment in which to promote high performance which will lead to the organization’s mission to be integrated with employee practice yielding the best possible outcome of services to children and families. Short Term Objectives of identifying a professional development model, training staff to the model, and initiating and maintaining monthly professional development meetings have been completed.

New Organizational structure provides more support to direct line staff through supervisors who are located in the same building as teachers, and mentor opportunities through the evidenced based model of practice based coaching.

For 2018: Focus on individualizing training to ensure higher skill development as part of succession planning for the FD program.

Career & Family Services

Short Term – Meeting/ planning with community groups and volunteers to create Community Garden on EOC lot. Remove tree, till soil, city water hookup and build raised beds. Completed

Long Term – Garden planted in 2018. Entire program run by volunteers and participants.

In Progress

Career & Family Services

Short Term: Community Garden, Getting Ahead Program Completed , In Progress

Long Term:  Getting Ahead program expands to other communities – volunteer run, Promote nutrition education and healthy foods classes

Career & Family Services

Short Term: Expand Food Pantry Veggie Van to include additional villages. Begin to partner with Market 32 to distribute excess food to area food banks. Completed

Long Term: Once in off-site location, expand Pantry hours to 5 or 6 days per week, Distribute fresh produce from pantry.